We support our Publishers and Content Creators. You can view this story on their website by CLICKING HERE.

You may have heard brief mention of a massacre in a Catholic Church a few days ago in Nigeria that killed more than 50 people at latest count. It’s the latest terror attack in Nigeria that appears to have been committed by adherents of that well-known “religion of peace.”

The president of Ireland, Michael Higgins, issued a statement deploring the massacre, which he attributed to . . . climate change. You have to read it, not to believe it:

STATEMENT BY PRESIDENT HIGGINS ON MASSACRE IN ST. FRANCIS CATHOLIC CHURCH IN OWO, NIGERIA

DATE: TUE 7TH JUN, 2022 | 16:24

“As President of Ireland, and on behalf of the people of Ireland, may I express my deepest condolences to the families of all those killed and injured in Owo District of Nigeria in the attack on St Francis Catholic Church, as they marked Pentecost Sunday.

That such an attack was made in a place of worship is a source of particular condemnation, as is any attempt to scapegoat pastoral peoples who are among the foremost victims of the consequences of climate change.

The neglect of food security issues in Africa, for so long has brought us to a point of crisis that is now having internal and regional effects based on struggles, ways of life themselves.

The solidarity of us all, as peoples of the world, is owed to all those impacted not only by this horrible event but in the struggle by the most vulnerable on whom the consequences of climate change have been inflicted.”

Let’s hope Higgins doesn’t issue s statement about school shootings in America. I’d hate to see the contortions he’d have to make to link “assault” weapons to climate change, though in fact there’s off-the-shelf “research” ready for use:

How Climate Change Could Worsen Gun Violence

When Daniel Semenza read the United Nations’ alarming August report on the worsening climate crisis, he immediately thought about how increasing global temperatures would exacerbate violent crime. The criminologist and Rutgers University–Camden professor has spent years studying violent crime and health disparities, and he has long been urging people to take their connection seriously. . . the communities hit hardest by gun violence will also bear the brunt of climate change-related gun violence.