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National Education Association affiliate in Maryland says standardized tests are dangerous —but at least one concerned mom, Julie Giordano, is pushing back on what she says is a frustrating situation and lowering the bar on education.

According to Fox News, “A Maryland teachers’ association blamed ‘white-centered contexts’ for causing some students to be left behind academically, according to its website.”

“The Maryland State Education Association listed under their ‘racial and social justice’ page on how standardized tests are biased against students of color,” Fox continues.

“MSEA has a long tradition of opposing dangerous standardized tests that for so many years left strong students behind because of the white-centered contexts, and strongly advocating for culturally relevant pedagogy and instructional practices, restorative approaches to maintain safe and healthy school communities, the use of trauma-informed best practices and a focus on social-emotional learning, and unencumbered access to equitable opportunities for all students,” the association stated on their website. “We believe that the lives of our Black and Brown students matter and that all students have a fundamental right to be educated in safe, healthy, and supportive learning communities and all educators deserve safe, healthy, and supportive working environments.”

Giordano says this represents a larger problem —a focus on “equity” as opposed to “academics.”

“I was actually really appalled to see that. I am not part of the teachers union. I actually opted out years ago because they don’t really support the candidates that I want to support,” Giordano said, who is also running for Wicomico County executive as a Republican.

“It’s just frustrating as a teacher,” she said. “We have just lowered the bar in education. Unfortunately for students, I think that they have to do the bare minimum in order just to pass.”

“I want the people…  to know that we have woken up – and it’s about time,” she said.

“I think that we have kind of sat with our eyes closed for a long time. And I think that people are starting to see the importance of local elections, which is great. It can’t just be presidential or even just the governor’s race. We really need to make sure that down-ticket we are voting in the very best people,” she said. “Change is coming… and it’s coming very soon.”