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No, no, no, no, NO!

Those pillowy golden puffs of classic movie-theater popcorn, covered in fake butter and all-too-real salt, could be in short supply. “Popcorn supply will be tight,” Preferred Popcorn chief executive Norm Krug told the Wall Street Journal.

Just when we’re gearing up to watch MSNBC on what is likely to be the Democrats’ worst midterm election night wipeout since their last midterm election wipeout, this has to happen. I’m starting to be very disappointed in the Biden Administration.

You know the old joke about how the mainstream media plays bad news with the race and class angle: “Women and Minorities Hardest Hit”? Well:

Government officials have said the shortage is especially acute for families that rely on subsidies from the federally funded Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants and Children, or WIC, as well as for infants with special dietary needs. The Access to Baby Formula Act of 2022 signed by Mr. Biden last month allows families to buy formula products beyond what the WIC program rules allow.

Gee, I wonder if there’s any connection between government subsidies and regulations and this artificial shortage? The Wall Street Journal helpfully explains:

The program’s exclusive sales contract system ensures that in each state, one of the major formula brands has the majority of market share.

The result is a marketplace with little competition and little flexibility, making it vulnerable if something goes wrong.

WIC state agencies reimburse retailers the full retail price of the formula purchased with WIC vouchers. The agencies then request rebate reimbursements from manufacturers. Program participants are required to use their vouchers for formula made by the state’s designated manufacturer, dramatically increasing that company’s market share in a given state.

The program’s exclusive sales contract system with major formula brands makes it difficult for smaller makers to gain market share. Abbott’s Similac brand is the most widely used in WIC, covering 34 states and the District of Columbia.

Nothing like creating artificial monopolies for guaranteeing shortages when the slightest thing goes wrong. Meanwhile:

As previously mentioned, June is Pride Month. The Advocate celebrates with this cover:

So, a self-identified “bi-sexual” guy with a woman. In other words, a heterosexual couple. What’s the big deal?