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New York Post columnist Miranda Devine and two Post reporters seem to have discovered the benefactor who has kept Hunter Biden rolling in the style to which he has become accustomed. He is a wealthy Hollywood figure named Kevin Morris. Morris has money to burn from sources other than the royalties on White Man’s Problems, his 2014 book of short stories. Here is the heart of the Post story:

A bigshot Hollywood lawyer reportedly paid off Hunter Biden’s delinquent taxes — which a source told The Post amounted to more than $2 million — as President Joe Biden’s notoriously troubled son awaits the results of a Delaware grand jury’s investigation into his personal finances.

Kevin Morris, an entertainment attorney and novelist who earned a fortune representing the co-creators of “South Park” and won a Tony award as the co-producer of “The Book of Mormon,” footed Hunter Biden’s overdue taxes totaling over $2 million — more than twice that which was previously reported, a source familiar with conversations between the two told the Post.

Morris, whom Hunter Biden’s friends call his latest “sugar brother,” has also been funding the 52-year-old’s lifestyle in Los Angeles — including his rent and living expenses, the source said.

The attorney has also been advising the president’s son on how to structure his art sales, according to the source.

When the Post attempted to contact Morris at his Malibu residence to ask about his dealings with Hunter Biden, his wife slammed the door in the reporter’s face and refused to answer questions.

The Post shortchanges Morris’s literary career. Morris is not just the author of White Man’s Problems. He is also the author of All Joe Knight (2016) and, most recently, Gettysburg (2020), all published by Grove Atlantic. Grove Atlantic offers this take on White Man’s Problems:

In nine stories that move between nouveau riche Los Angeles and the working class East Coast, Kevin Morris explores the vicissitudes of modern life. Whether looking for creative ways to let off steam after a day in court or enduring chaperone duties on a school field trip to the nation’s capital, the heroes of White Man’s Problems struggle to navigate the challenges that accompany marriage, family, success, failure, growing up, and getting older.

The themes of these perceptive, wry and sometimes humorous tales pose philosophical questions about conformity and class, duplicity and decency, and the actions and meaning of an average man’s life. Morris’s confident debut strikes the perfect balance between comedy and catastrophe—and introduces a virtuosic new voice in American fiction.

And to think this was before Morris teamed up with Hunter Biden. I wonder if Morris is writing off any of his Biden financial support as research for his continuing work on “philosophical questions about conformity and class, duplicity and decency, and the actions and meaning of an average man’s life.” Well, strike “the action and meaning of an average man’s life.”